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Book cover The Bomb That Blew up God

THE BOMB THAT BLEW UP GOD

AND OTHER SERIOUS POEMS

by

Freddy Niagara Fonseca

aka Cosmopolitan Poet

A groundbreaking book of poetry in seven chapters:

1. A ray of hope enlivens a dark universe.

2. Dances, music, magic explode with joyful energy.

3. Challenging situations dealing with existential fears.

4. Brief, daring sketches and humor.

5. Death appearing from multiple angles.

6. New doors open to theatrical and profound monologues.

7. Nature shining at its most beautiful and uplifting.

 

The title poem,

The Bomb That Blew Up God,

is an innocent fable

told in a humorous, conversational tone,

depicting the eternal struggle

 between good and evil with a surprise ending.

When you pick up my book,

you’ll be traveling far and wide

with my generous Muse and me.

Unimagined places around the world

and deeply felt poetry await you.

Come, join us.

Buy your copy on Amazon today.

Available in 16 countries:

Australia, Brazil, Canada, France,

Germany, India, Italy, Japan,

Mexico, Netherlands, Portugal, Singapore,

Spain, United Arab Emirates, UK, US 

For an autographed copy,

click here

YOUTUBE VIDEO PREMIERE:

The Bomb That Blew Up God,

a New Poetry Book by Freddy Niagara Fonseca

The Bomb That Blew Up God sitting on a night stand by a beautiful lamp

My book, The Bomb That Blew Up God, in San Francisco,

on my friend Richard Bradley’s nightstand.

 

Fireworks

pow, ka-BOOOOM, fizzzz.

yellow — pink — green — ahhh,

and behind all that emotion:

endless eternities of stars . . .

 

 

a page from the bomb that Blew Up God

ON A MEDIEVAL PAINTING OF THE FALL OF MAN

 

The Angel turned them out of Paradise,

And God withdrew within.

A glorious Realm receded from their Eyes.

They shrank from loving Him.

 

The World is like a Darker Sphere until

We meet His Love within.

An Angel full of Grace is waiting still

To lead us back to Him.

 

 

Freddy Niagara Fonseca

 

I wrote this poem in 1980 on returning from a trip to Greece and seeing a small, Medieval, Italian painting in a museum in the south of France, depicting the story line in the poem. The presence of God in the painting was uncanny.